4 Unconventional Fun Run Themes (And How to Create Your Own!)

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The Fun Run market has blown up in the past decade and for very, very good reason: They’re fun!

Both athletes and people who just want to create a memorable experience with their friends commune at these events to mix sports with a wacky theme. And, for these types of events, the more elaborate the theme, the better. The more participants are incentivized to prepare prior to the event, the more buzz the event creates and the more success it sees.

If you’re considering creating your own Fun Run, you should know that dreaming up a great theme is one of the most important steps. Thankfully, we’ve assembled some of the coolest Fun Run themes to help you come up with your own great idea.

How These 4 Highly Successful Runs Evolved

1) Replicate the Atmosphere of a Carnival: The Great Candy Run.

Because who doesn’t love candy? This charity Fun Run actually began its life as the Race for Fetal Hope. Organizer Lonnie Somers decided to think about what the race was really offering participants, which was lots of festival-like activities for kids and adults including face painting and live entertainment. From there, it only made sense to change the name to something that really reflects what participants should expect from the race. The change more than doubled the race’s participants, allowing it to raise even more money for fetal syndromes.

2) Organize Around a Favorite Beverage: Wicked Wine Run.

We don’t want to make assumptions, but wine is a bit of a universal elixir, amiright? For folks who are up for a no-stress 5K followed by copious amounts of grown-up grape juice, the Wicked Wine Run is an absolute godsend. The race’s success and rapidly expanding markets are proof that they’ve hit a very fun chord with fans of the race’s theme. Beyond having a kick-butt theme, the race’s organizers are complete whizzes with social media, providing lots of informative, themed Facebook posts leading up to all of their events.

3) Rekindle Fond Childhood Memories: Disney Princess Run.

While the distances for the Princess Runs vary from a standard, Fun Run 5K all the way up to a half-marathon, the races follow the same thematic blueprint as Fun Runs that have come before them. As the name implies, racers sign up for the Princess Runs not only to challenge themselves with a race and raise funds for hospitals ($4.2 billion raised so far!), but also for the thrill of running through a Disney park decked out in a tutu. The theme of allowing adults to rediscover their inner princess runs throughout the event, as well, with bedazzled tiara medals and Disney characters showing up along the race course to cheer on participants.

4) Make the City Your Theme: Colfax 5K.

Serving as the opening event during a weekend of endurance events in Denver, one of the Colfax 5K’s goals is to showcase the beauty of the city. Named for Colfax Street, the longest Main Street in America, the Colfax Marathon, and all of its accompanying events (the 5K is one of them), runners see sights that only Denver has to offer during all of the weekend’s races.

Run530, an early morning race that started in Italy and is now spreading throughout Europe, takes the cultural theme to even greater heights.

how-to-organize-a-fun-run-imageHow Fun Will YOUR Run Be?

Now it’s time to pick a theme for your Fun Run. Think about what makes your city great, or a unique experience that hasn’t been brought to the Fun Run space in your area. Then, think about all of the ways you can blow out that theme for your event: Could participants wear costumes or other special attire? Could you select a race course that reflects your theme? What about sponsors that ties in with your theme?

Next, be sure to download our free guide, “How to Organize a Fun Run,” which will help to guide you in planning a Fun Run, from the first step all the way to the last.

 

 

 

 

Gina Calvert

Gina Calvert is the Senior Marketing Writer for ACTIVE Network, providing marketing and business resources for active lifestyle organizations across a range of markets, including government, nonprofits, camps, schools and endurance events, for more than six years.

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